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16/09/2022

How do nursery fees differ depending on the month your child is born?

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As Save the Children Scotland calls for urgent action on the cost-of-living crisis, many parents across the country are likely looking for ways to reduce their daily expenses.

Save the Children Scotland has claimed that the soaring energy and food prices are having an “enormous toll on parents’ mental health.” The rising cost of living is leading more people to borrow money to cover the cost of daily essentials. As a result, more people may be seeking more affordable ways to reduce their monthly debt repayments through a Trust Deed.

 

As Save the Children Scotland calls for urgent action on the cost-of-living crisis, many parents across the country are likely looking for ways to reduce their daily expenses.

Save the Children Scotland has claimed that the soaring energy and food prices are having an “enormous toll on parents’ mental health.” The rising cost of living is leading more people to borrow money to cover the cost of daily essentials. As a result, more people may be seeking more affordable ways to reduce their monthly debt repayments through a Trust Deed.

Inflation has also had a knock-on effect on childcare costs. In our Nursery Fees Report, Carrington Dean has found that the average day rate for nurseries in the four largest cities in Scotland is £52.78 – or £263.90 per week.

 

The current state of debt-levels for parents in Scotland

In Scotland, the average debt level for parents of children is £17,054, based on Carrington Dean figures – higher than the national average of £16,887. This is based on the analysis of the four most populated cities in Scotland – Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Dundee.

This number increased for parents with children aged 18 and below – where the debt level was £18,155. This is according to an analysis of 20,481 Carrington Dean customers in Scotland.

 

How will my child’s birth date affect my personal finances?

 According to our Nursery Fees Report, parents in Scotland who have a child in late January or February are likely to spend thousands of pounds less on childcare, compared to if their child is born in March.

This is because children who are born in March have to wait almost 12 months after they turn five-years-old to go to school full-time. For children born in February, they start school shortly after their fourth birthday.

As a result, some parents are spending over £15,500 extra per year on nursery fees. While it’s difficult to be able to time exactly when you do have a child, if you have the luxury of having flexibility in deciding when to conceive, parents who give birth in January and February may save financially.

 

How much can I expect to spend by having a March child?

Carrington Dean analysed hundreds of nursery day fees across the UK to paint a clear picture of the national childcare cost crisis.

If your child is born on 1 March, parents could be spending an average of £13,407 on childcare in the year prior to them starting school – compared to £844.55 if they are born on 1 February.

This research is based on the assumption that your child attends nursery full-time on every working day of the year, excluding bank holidays and weekends. Some parents may be able to secure 30 hours free funding per week at nurseries depending on their income and child’s age, which would reduce this figure.

The average amount of money parents are likely to spend on nursery fees depending on when their child is born:

 

Child’s birth date Nursery cost for child turning 4-years-old before starting school
1 March £13,407.26
1 April £12,271.00
1 May £11,137.52
1 June £9,9976.27
1 July £8,815.01
1 August £7,653.75
1 September £6,598.06
1 October £5,384.02
1 November £4,328.33
1 December £3,114.28
1 January £1,953.03
1 February £844.55

 

A regional focus shows Aberdeen residents will feel the brunt of nursery costs the most

Aberdeen had the highest day rate for nurseries on average, with parents in the city expected to pay an average of £65.21 per day to send their children to nursery.

If a child in Aberdeen born on 1 September were to go to nursery every working day of the year, their parents can be expected to pay up to £16,564.10 for childcare.

This is followed by Edinburgh, at £12,985.75, Dundee at £12,623 and Glasgow at £11,455.

The average amount of money parents are likely to spend on nursery fees depending on when their child is born:

 

Child’s birth date Nursery cost for child turning 4-years-old before starting school
1 March £13,407.26
1 April £12,271.00
1 May £11,137.52
1 June £9,9976.27
1 July £8,815.01
1 August £7,653.75
1 September £6,598.06
1 October £5,384.02
1 November £4,328.33
1 December £3,114.28
1 January £1,953.03
1 February £844.55

 

Calculator – how much can I expect to save?

We’ve created a calculator tool if you’re wondering how much extra you could expect to spend depending on when your child is born.

Simply click on your location and date of birth or proposed birth date below:

Childcare Calculator

With our calculation tool you can easily see the costs for the childcare you need.

What city do you live in?

When was your child born?

Your childcare estimate:

8,617.76

PER YEAR

Start again
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If you’re worried about the cost of nursery fees

If you are struggling to cover the cost of nursery, some parents may be eligible for 30-hours free childcare per week, and can find out more details on the government website.

Alternatively, if you’re worried about the rising cost of living and childcare, or struggling with debt, you should consider a Debt Arrangement Scheme or a Trust Deed to help you manage your finances and reduce your monthly outgoings.

 

Why choose Carrington Dean?

  • Write off unsecured debts over £5,000.
  • Stop interest and charges soaring.
  • Reduced payments from £85 per month.

 

Methodology

Carrington Dean sampled ten day nurseries in each of the 100 largest towns and cities across the UK. Population data was taken from The Geographist.

Carrington Dean then created an average of each area to establish the most expensive areas in the UK. We then created a formula to establish how much extra it would cost to send your child to nursery for each academic month before the school year begins. This does not include weekends or bank holidays.

Nurseries analysed include council-backed and private nurseries, to give a clear overall picture of nursery rates in the UK.

Parent debt levels are taken from Carrington Dean and Creditfix, and are based on the debt levels of 20,481 customers. Data correct as of 1 September 2022.

 

 

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